Using Prayer and Meditation to Ease Anxiety

Updated: Jun 21, 2021


Meditation by the sea

Which is Better: Prayer or Meditation?


Use whichever you prefer, there really is no right or wrong way to do it as long as it works for you. Some people have a close relationship with The Creator, some don’t, and that’s ok. Meditation and prayer have less to do with religion and more to do with connecting with your own inner peace. So, no matter your religious belief, or non-belief, you can conquer your anxiety through your thoughts and affirmations, and hopefully, avoid medications and other mind-altering substances.

If you like to pray, that's great. If you want to meditate instead, then do it! Whichever technique makes you feel the most comfortable is acceptable. This is about getting better, and you know best what will make you feel at ease.

How to Get Started


You can start on your path to an anxiety-free life right away and it all starts with a deep breath. Pull the air deep down into your diaphragm and let it out slowly. Do this several times and you'll begin to feel calmer.

Are you breathing effectively? When you take in air, if only the top part of your lungs expands, your chest rises and falls. When you breathe the right way - the calming way - your belly rises and falls, not your upper chest, because your entire lungs are being filled with fresh air.

Avoid breathing from your upper chest only and you'll already be on the road to feeling calmer and less anxious. It's a simple thing to do and a great way to get started. The more you do it, the more it'll become automatic. Soon, you'll feel calmer without even thinking about your breathing anymore.


Here are some other tips to help you feel calm while praying or meditating:

  1. Use your breathing like a mantra. Inhale while you give yourself positive thoughts and feelings. Exhale any negativity you're thinking or feeling. Breathing is the rhythm of life, use it to your advantage.

  2. Pray or meditate at the same time each day. Spend a few minutes - it doesn't have to be a long time - in quiet reflection. Say good things to yourself. You can focus on your health, finances, family, or anything you want to make stronger. Avoid negative thinking during this time.

  3. Pray or meditate with others. Join a church, take up yoga, or find a support group for anxiety. Many others share your struggle, and you can feel better about yourself and more in-tune with others when you share your feelings.

Next Steps



When you start your journey toward personal peace through prayer or meditation, expect to conquer your anxiety. Now it’s not going to happen overnight, because it took longer than that to get here. You are healing yourself from years of personal trauma that led you down the path to anxiety. Take your time and learn what works for you, there is no rush, and you will start to feel a difference when the time is right for it to happen. It took me years to finally get to a point where I could stop the anxiety through meditation and prayer.


The important thing is to take that first step and then enjoy and appreciate the journey.


Every journey begins with that first step, and once you make it you'll be well on your way. Breathe. Laugh. Meditate or pray. Find time to think about and interact with others, rather than concentrating on your worries.

When you do these things, you'll become calmer and more focused. Most importantly, you'll be back to being happy again, and there's no greater gift you can give yourself than joy!



 

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About Angela M Mitchell


Angela M Mitchell is a Certified Master Life & Personal Development Coach, a mental health advocate, founder of Back To Her, and a Co-Author in the international best-selling collaborative masterpiece The Image in The Mirror. She assists women entrepreneurs who are experiencing emotional overwhelm to acknowledge their struggles, change the narrative, and rewrite their life stories so that they can become deliberate, not desperate creators of their life's story. Angela resides in Buffalo, NY and is the mother of three and grandmother of two.